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Dryad

Use of a pressure wire for automatically correcting artifacts in phasic pressure tracings from a fluid-filled catheter

Cite this dataset

Johnson, Nils (2022). Use of a pressure wire for automatically correcting artifacts in phasic pressure tracings from a fluid-filled catheter [Dataset]. Dryad. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.rjdfn2zdw

Abstract

Background/purpose: Matching phasic pressure tracings between a fluid-filled catheter and high-fidelity pressure wire has received limited attention, although each part contributes half of the information to clinical decisions. We aimed to study the impact of a novel and automated method for improving the phasic calibration of a fluid-filled catheter by accounting for its oscillatory behavior.
 
Methods/materials: Retrospective analysis of drift check tracings was performed using our algorithm that corrects for mean difference (offset), temporal delays (timing), differential sensitivity of the manifold transducer and pressure wire sensor (gain), and the oscillatory behavior of the fluid-filled catheter described by its resonant frequency and damping factor (how quickly oscillations disappear after a change in pressure).
 
Results: Among 2886 cases, correcting for oscillations showed a large improvement in 28% and a medium improvement in 41% (decrease in root mean square error >0.5 mmHg to <1 or 1–2 mmHg, respectively). 96 % of oscillators were underdamped with median damping factor of 0.27 and frequency of 10.6 Hz. Fractional flow reserve or baseline Pd/Pa demonstrated no clinically important bias when ignoring oscillations. However, uncorrected subcycle non-hyperemic pressure ratios (NHPR) displayed both bias and scatter.
 
Conclusions: By automatically accounting for the oscillatory behavior of a fluid-filled catheter system, phasic matching against a high-fidelity pressure wire can be improved compared to standard equalization methods. The majority of tracings contain artifacts, mainly due to underdamped oscillations, and neglecting them leads to biased estimates of equalization parameters. No clinically important bias exists for whole-cycle metrics, in contrast to significant effects on subcycle NHPR.