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Data from: Consequences of mating with siblings and nonsiblings on the reproductive success in a leaf beetle

Citation

Müller, Thorben; Müller, Caroline (2017), Data from: Consequences of mating with siblings and nonsiblings on the reproductive success in a leaf beetle, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.rm7cd

Abstract

Choosing a suitable mating partner is crucial for the fitness of an individual, whereby mating with siblings often results in inbreeding depression. We studied consequences of mating with siblings versus nonsiblings in the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), on lifetime reproductive traits. Furthermore, we analyzed whether cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles are family specific and could potentially influence the mating behavior of young adults. We hypothesized a reduced reproductive success of females mated with siblings and a more rapid mating of males with nonsiblings. The hatching rate from eggs of sibling pairs was lower compared to that of nonsibling pairs, pointing to inbreeding depression. Furthermore, the number of eggs laid by females decreased over time in both sibling and nonsibling pairs. Interestingly, the CHC profiles and the body mass differed between families. However, the beetles did not avoid siblings and accepted them as readily as nonsiblings for mating in no-choice tests. In summary, although it had negative consequences to mate a sibling and although siblings could potentially be recognized by their CHC profiles, the beetles did not show a delayed mating with siblings. Our results indicate that P. cochleariae beetles have not developed a precopulatory mechanism to avoid inbreeding, at least under the test conditions applied here. We predict that instead a polyandrous mating system and/or postcopulatory mechanisms might have evolved in this species by which inbreeding costs can be reduced.

Usage Notes

Location

Germany