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Data from: Shrubs as ecosystem engineers across an environmental gradient: effects on species richness and exotic plant invasion

Citation

Kleinhesselink, Andrew R.; Magnoli, Susan M.; Cushman, J. Hall (2015), Data from: Shrubs as ecosystem engineers across an environmental gradient: effects on species richness and exotic plant invasion, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.rn7c5

Abstract

Ecosystem-engineering plants modify the physical environment and can increase species diversity and exotic species invasion. At the individual level, the effects of ecosystem engineers on other plants often become more positive in stressful environments. In this study, we investigated whether the community-level effects of ecosystem engineers also become stronger in more stressful environments. Using comparative and experimental approaches, we assessed the ability of a native shrub (Ericameria ericoides) to act as an ecosystem engineer across a stress gradient in a coastal dune in northern California, USA. We found increased coarse organic matter and lower wind speeds within shrub patches. Growth of a dominant invasive grass (Bromus diandrus) was facilitated both by aboveground shrub biomass and by growing in soil taken from shrub patches. Experimental removal of shrubs negatively affected species most associated with shrubs and positively affected species most often found outside of shrubs. Counter to the stress-gradient hypothesis, the effects of shrubs on the physical environment and individual plant growth did not increase across the established stress gradient at this site. At the community level, shrub patches increased beta diversity, and contained greater rarified richness and exotic plant cover than shrub-free patches. Shrub effects on rarified richness increased with environmental stress, but effects on exotic cover and beta diversity did not. Our study provides evidence for the community-level effects of shrubs as ecosystem engineers in this system, but shows that these effects do not necessarily become stronger in more stressful environments.

Usage Notes

Location

Bodega Marine Reserve
38°19′N
Sonoma County California
123°3′W
Sonoma County, California