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Data from: Synchronous effects produce cycles in deer populations and deer-vehicle collisions

Citation

Anderson, Thomas et al. (2021), Data from: Synchronous effects produce cycles in deer populations and deer-vehicle collisions, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.rn8pk0p85

Abstract

Population cycles are fundamentally linked with spatial synchrony, the prevailing paradigm being that populations with cyclic dynamics are easily synchronized. That is, population cycles help give rise to spatial synchrony. Here we demonstrate this process can work in reverse, with synchrony causing population cycles. We show that timescale-specific environmental effects, by synchronizing local population dynamics on certain timescales only, cause major population cycles over large areas in white-tailed deer. An important aspect of the new mechanism is specificity of synchronizing effects to certain timescales, which causes local dynamics to sum across space to a substantial cycle on those timescales. We also demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that synchrony can be transmitted not only from environmental drivers to populations (deer), but also from there to human systems (deer-vehicle collisions). Because synchrony of drivers may be altered by climate change, changes to population cycles may arise via our mechanism.

Usage Notes

See the included ReadMe.pdf file for information on each comma-delimited (.csv) data file.