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Data from: First dispersal records of the endangered Banteng (Bos javanicus) in Thung Yai Naresuan West Wildlife Sanctuary, Thailand

Cite this dataset

Amorntiyangkul, Peerawit (2024). Data from: First dispersal records of the endangered Banteng (Bos javanicus) in Thung Yai Naresuan West Wildlife Sanctuary, Thailand [Dataset]. Dryad. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.rn8pk0pjc

Abstract

Banteng (Bos javanicus) is listed as an endangered species because of a global population decline of at least 50% over the last 25 years. The Western Forest Complex (WEFCOM) of Thailand has been identified as a priority site for banteng population recovery, and Huai Kha Keang Wildlife Sanctuary (HKK) is the most important source site for this species within the WEFCOM. We have provided evidence and discussed banteng dispersal from HKK to Thung Yai Naresuan West Wildlife Sanctuary (TYW). We sampled an area of 147 km2 in banteng habitat next to the border between HKK and TYW using camera traps. We divided the sampled area into four grid cells and placed camera traps during January to December 2022. We setup the camera traps near saltlicks and natural water sources, as important resources for banteng, to maximize capture probability. In total, 2,835 trap days were obtained. Bantengs were captured in all seasons (RAI=1.66), especially in dry dipterocarp forest, which contains the ground forage availability for banteng, and the low-slope area with elevation 600–700 m adjacent to the border between HKK and TYW. The results highlighted that banteng, which had never been reported in TYW before, appeared there for the first time. They most likely dispersed from the population source in HKK and settled in a habitat that is considered suitable for them. The habitat management and protection are significant for the future recovery of banteng populations in the TYW and the rest of protected areas in the WEFCOM.

README: First Dispersal Records of the Endangered Banteng (Bos javanicus) in Thung Yai Naresuan West Wildlife Sanctuary, THAILAND

https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.rn8pk0pjc

Description of the data and file structure

This study highlights the presence of bantengs in Thung Yai Naresuan West Wildlife Sanctuary, which had never been reported in TYW before, and appeared there for the first time. They most likely dispersed from the population source in HKK and settled in a habitat that is considered suitable for banteng. we have explained in the attached file to support the research include

  1. The summary of camera trapping in Thung Yai Naresuan West Wildlife Sanctuary during January-December 2022, we combiled summary data in this study except the camera trap locations, include  location ID, season, number of trap nights, number of banteng captured events and number of individual count. See in TYW_Banteng_Rawdata
  2. The result of endangered banteng captured in the study area with the relative abundance index (RAI ratio), which is calculated as (Independent photos/trap nights). See in Banteng_RAIratio
  3. The example of banteng captured vedios in TYW during the period. See in Video_Figure2A and Video_Figure2B

Methods

A camera-trapping survey was conducted to study banteng habitat use in Thung Yai Naresuan West Wildlife Sanctuary from January to December 2022. We sampled 147 km2 surrounding their habitat and divided the area into four grid cells of 7 × 7 km per grid cell, following the banteng home range of 49 km2 in Thailand (Prayurasiddhi, 1997) (Figure 1). Each large grid cell was further divided into four 3.5 x 3.5 km grid cells for camera trap spacing and placement to investigate banteng habitat use. For camera trap placement, we took into account the factors influencing banteng distribution and intensity of habitat use, especially near saltlicks and water sources, in order to maximizing capture probability (Suksavate et al., 2022; Thapa et al., 2019). We set camera traps at 33 locations using a combination of the camera trap models Bushnell DS-4K and Spartan E4GB2, which were the main camera traps used in this study (Figure 1). Camera traps were placed 40–60 cm above the ground and set up along ridges, saltlicks, water sources, and wildlife trails (Silver et al., 2004; Suksavate et al., 2022). For data interpretation and analysis, we considered consecutive photos with a time interval of more than 30 min as new photographic events (O'Brien et al., 2003; Rahman, 2019; Saisamorn et al., 2019). Banteng age class classification was defined for individuals in each capture event as adult (> 3-years old), juvenile (1–3 year-olds), or calf (< 1 years old), based on the body shape and size (Phoonjampa et al., 2021).

Funding

United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Arcadia Fund

Liz Claiborne and Art Ortenberg Foundation

Robertson Foundation