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Genetics of quantitative traits with dominance under stabilizing and directional selection in partially selfing species

Citation

CLO, Josselin; Opedal, Øystein (2021), Genetics of quantitative traits with dominance under stabilizing and directional selection in partially selfing species, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.rr4xgxd8d

Abstract

Recurrent self-fertilization is thought to lead to reduced adaptive potential by decreasing the genetic diversity of populations, thus leading selfing lineages down an evolutionary ‘blind alley’. Though well supported theoretically, empirical support for reduced adaptability in selfing species is limited. One limitation of classical theoretical models is that they assume pure additivity of the fitness-related traits that are under stabilizing selection, despite ample evidence that quantitative traits are subject to dominance. Here we relax this assumption and explore the effect of dominance on a fitness-related trait under stabilizing selection for populations that differ in selfing rates. By decomposing the genetic variance into additional components specific to inbred populations, we show that dominance components can explain a substantial part of the genetic variance of inbred populations. We also show that ignoring these components leads to an upward bias in the predicted response to selection. Finally, we show that when considering the effect of dominance, the short-term evolutionary potential of populations remains comparable across the entire gradient in outcrossing rates, and genetic associations can even make selfing populations more evolvable on the longer term, reconciling theoretical and empirical results.