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Data from: Recording and reproducing the diurnal oviposition rhythms of wild populations of the soft- and stone- fruit pest Drosophila suzukii

Citation

Shaw, Bethan; Michelle, Fountain T.; Herman, Wijnen; Wijnen, Herman (2018), Data from: Recording and reproducing the diurnal oviposition rhythms of wild populations of the soft- and stone- fruit pest Drosophila suzukii, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.rt714c5

Abstract

Drosophila suzukii is a horticultural pest on a global scale which causes both yield and economic losses on a range of soft- and stone-fruit. Tackling this pest is problematic but exploiting behavioural rhythms could increase the impact of control. To do this, a better understanding of behavioural patterns is needed. Within this study we aimed to investigate rhythms in reproductive behaviour of wild D. suzukii under natural conditions in the field. Environmental parameters were also recorded to decipher how they influence these rhythms. Assays were then performed on laboratory cultures, housed under artificial conditions mimicking the temperature and light cycles, to see if these patterns were reproducible and rhythmic. We were able to promote field like oviposition patterns within the laboratory using realistic temperature and light cycles regardless of variations in other factors including substrate, humidity, and lighting type. Locomotion activity was also recorded under these mimicked conditions to identify how this behaviour interacts with oviposition rhythms. Both our field and laboratory assays show that oviposition behaviour is likely under the control of the circadian clock and primarily occurs during the day. However, consistent with prior reports we observed that these patterns become crepuscular when day-time temperature peaks exceeded 30°C. This was also found within locomotion rhythms. With an increased understanding of how these behaviours are influenced by environmental conditions, we highlight the importance of using realistic temperature and light cycles when investigating behavioural patterns. From an increased understanding of D. suzukii behaviour we increase our ability to target the pest in the field.

Usage Notes

Location

Kent
United Kingdom