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Data from: Functional coupling constrains craniofacial diversification in Lake Tanganyika cichlids

Citation

Tsuboi, Masahito; Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro; Kolm, Niclas (2015), Data from: Functional coupling constrains craniofacial diversification in Lake Tanganyika cichlids, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.s1kg8

Abstract

Functional coupling, where a single morphological trait performs multiple functions, is a universal feature of organismal design. Theory suggests that functional coupling may constrain the rate of phenotypic evolution, yet empirical tests of this hypothesis are rare. In fish, the evolutionary transition from guarding the eggs on a sandy/rocky substrate (i.e. substrate guarding) to mouthbrooding introduces a novel function to the craniofacial system and offers an ideal opportunity to test the functional coupling hypothesis. Using a combination of geometric morphometrics and a recently developed phylogenetic comparative method, we found that head morphology evolution was 43% faster in substrate guarding species than in mouthbrooding species. Furthermore, for species in which females were solely responsible for mouthbrooding the males had a higher rate of head morphology evolution than in those with bi-parental mouthbrooding. Our results support the hypothesis that adaptations resulting in functional coupling constrain phenotypic evolution.

Usage Notes

Location

Lake Tanganyika