Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Evolutionary relationship of fat body endoreduplication and queen fecundity in termites

Citation

Nozaki, Tomonari; Matsuura, Kenji (2020), Data from: Evolutionary relationship of fat body endoreduplication and queen fecundity in termites, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.s5v553b

Abstract

Endoreduplication or nuclear genome replication without cell division is widely observed in the metabolically active tissues of plants and animals. The fat body cells of adult female insects produce abundant yolk proteins and become polyploid, which is assumed to accelerate egg production. Recently, it was reported that in termites, endopolyploidy in the fat body occurs only in queens but not in the other females; however, the relationship between the fecundity and ploidy level in the fat body remains unclear. Termite queens exhibit a huge variation in their egg producing capacity among different species; queens in the species with a foraging lifestyle, in which workers leave the nest to forage outside, are much more fecund than those in the species living in a single piece of wood. In this study, we conducted ploidy analyses on three foraging and three wood-dwelling termites via flow cytometry. In all the species, the fat body of queens contained significantly more polyploid cells than that of other nonreproductive females, considering their body size effect. However, the male fat body, which is not involved in yolk production, did not show consistency in polyploid cell numbers among the species studied. Moreover, highly fecund queens in foraging termites exhibit higher levels of endopolyploidy in their fat body than those with less fecundity in wood-dwelling termites. These results suggest that endopolyploidy in the fat body of termite queens can boost their egg production, and the level of endopolyploidy in their fat body is linked to their fecundity. Our study provides a novel insight into the evolutionary relationship between endoreduplication and caste specialization in social insects.

Usage Notes

Location

Japan