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Data from: Persistent low toxoplasma IgG avidity is common in pregnancy: experience from antenatal testing in Norway

Citation

Findal, Gry et al. (2016), Data from: Persistent low toxoplasma IgG avidity is common in pregnancy: experience from antenatal testing in Norway, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.s6b7n

Abstract

The parasite Toxoplasma gondii might harm the fetus if a woman is infected during pregnancy. IgG seroconversion and significant increase in IgG antibody amount in pregnancy indicates maternal infection. Presence of toxoplasma immunoglobulin M (IgM), immunoglobulin G (IgG) and low IgG avidity in a single serum sample indicates possible maternal infection, but positive toxoplasma IgM and low IgG avidity may persist for months and even years. We aimed to evaluate avidity development during pregnancy in a retrospective study. Serial blood samples from 176 pregnant women admitted to Oslo University Hospital 1993–2013 for amniocentesis because of suspected toxoplasma infection were included. Data were obtained from journals and laboratory records. The avidity method used was based on Platelia Toxo IgG assay. Mean maternal age at first serology was 29.9 years (SD 5.2, range 18–42). In 37 (21%) women only the avidity increased from low to high in < 3 months. In 139 (79%) the IgG avidity remained below the high threshold ≥ 3 months and within this group 74 (42%) women had stable low IgG avidity during the observation period. Median gestational age at first test was 10.6 weeks (range 4.6–28.7). Fetal infection was detected in four children, but none among children whose mother had stable low IgG avidity. The first antenatal toxoplasma serology should ideally be collected in early pregnancy and if stable values of toxoplasma IgM and low IgG-avidity are detected in a second sample after three to four weeks, the need for amniocentesis can be questioned.

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Location

Norway