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Data from: Testing adaptive hypotheses on the evolution of larval life history in acorn and stalked barnacles

Citation

Ewers-Saucedo, Christine; Pappalardo, Paula (2019), Data from: Testing adaptive hypotheses on the evolution of larval life history in acorn and stalked barnacles, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.s8800t9

Abstract

Despite strong selective pressure to optimize larval life history in marine environments, there is a wide diversity with regard to developmental mode, size and time larvae spend in the plankton. In the present study, we assessed if adaptive hypotheses explain the distribution of the larval life history of thoracican barnacles within a strict phylogenetic framework. We collected environmental and larval trait data for 170 species from the literature, and utilized a complete thoracican synthesis tree to account for phylogenetic non-independence. In accordance with Thorson’s rule, the fraction of species with planktonic-feeding larvae declined with water depth and increased with water temperature, while the fraction of brooding species exhibited the reverse pattern. Species with planktonic-nonfeeding larvae were overall rare, following no apparent trend. In agreement with the “size advantage” hypothesis proposed by Strathmann in 1977, egg and larval size were closely correlated. Settlement-competent cypris larvae were larger in cold water, indicative of advantages for large juveniles when growth is slowed. Planktonic larval duration, on the other hand, was uncorrelated to environmental variables. We conclude that different selective pressures appear to shape the evolution of larval life history in barnacles.

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global