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Data from: Females can solve the problem of low signal reliability by assessing multiple male traits

Citation

Wegehaupt, Abigail K.; Wagner Jr., William E.; Wagner, William E. (2017), Data from: Females can solve the problem of low signal reliability by assessing multiple male traits, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.sj138

Abstract

Male signals that provide information to females about mating benefits are often of low reliability. It is thus not clear why females often express strong signal preferences. We tested the hypothesis that females can distinguish between males with preferred signals that provide lower and higher quality direct benefits. In the field cricket, Gryllus lineaticeps, females usually prefer higher male chirp rates, but chirp rate is positively correlated with the fecundity benefits females will receive from males only for males that have experienced low quality diets. We paired females with muted males that were maintained on low or high nutrition diets, during the interactions we broadcast a replacement high chirp rate, and we observed whether females mated with the assigned male. Females were more likely to mate when paired with low nutrition males. These results suggest that females have evolved assessment mechanisms that allow them distinguish between males with preferred signals that provide high quality benefits (low nutrition males with high chirp rates) and males with preferred signals that provide low quality benefits (high nutrition males with high chirp rates).

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: IOS-0818116

Location

Western United States