Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: A cryptic sex-linked locus revealed by the elimination of a master sex-determining locus in medaka fish

Citation

Kitano, Jun et al. (2022), Data from: A cryptic sex-linked locus revealed by the elimination of a master sex-determining locus in medaka fish, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.sn02v6x7p

Abstract

Sex chromosomes rapidly turn over in several taxonomic groups. Sex chromosome turnover is generally thought to start with the appearance of a new sex-determining gene on an autosome while an old sex-determining gene still exists, followed by the fixation of the new one. However, we do not know how prevalent the transient state is, where multiple sex-determining loci co-exist within natural populations. Here, we removed a Y chromosome with a master male-determining gene DMY from medaka fish using high temperature-induced sex-reversed males. After four generations, the genomic characteristics of a sex chromosome were found on one chromosome, which was an autosome in the original population. Thus, the elimination of a master sex-determining locus can reveal a cryptic locus with a possible sex-determining effect, which can be the seed for sex chromosome turnover. Our results suggest that populations that seem to have a single-locus XY system may have other chromosomal regions with sex-determining effects. In conclusion, the coexistence of multiple sex-determining genes in a natural population may be more prevalent than previously thought. Experimental elimination of a master sex-determining locus may serve as a promising method for finding a locus that can be a proto-sex chromosome.

Funding

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: 16K14792

Japan Science and Technology Agency, Award: JPMJCR20S2

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: 21H04782