Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Generalization of learned preferences covaries with behavioral flexibility in red junglefowl chicks

Citation

Zidar, Josefina; Balogh, Alexandra; Leimar, Olof; Lovlie, Hanne (2019), Data from: Generalization of learned preferences covaries with behavioral flexibility in red junglefowl chicks, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.sq828qd

Abstract

The relationship between animal cognition and consistent among-individual behavioral differences (i.e. behavioral types, animal personality, or coping styles), has recently received increased research attention. Focus has mainly been on linking different behavioral types to performance in learning tasks. It has been suggested that behavioral differences could influence also how individuals use previously learnt information to generalize about new stimuli with similar properties. Nonetheless, this has rarely been empirically tested. Here we therefore explore the possibility that individual variation in generalization is related to variation in behavioral types in red junglefowl chicks (Gallus gallus). We show that more behaviorally flexible chicks have a stronger preference for a novel stimulus that is intermediate between two learnt positive stimuli compared to more inflexible chicks. Thus, more flexible and inflexible chicks differ in how they generalize. Further, behavioral flexibility correlates with fearfulness, suggesting a coping style, supporting that variation in generalization is related to variation in behavioral types. How individuals generalize affects decision making and responses to novel situations or objects, and can thus have a broad influence on the life of an individual. Our results add to the growing body of evidence linking cognition to consistent behavioral differences.

Usage Notes