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Raw microscopy data from: Endoplasmic reticulum stress activates human IRE1α through reversible assembly of inactive dimers into small oligomers

Citation

Belyy, Vladislav et al. (2022), Raw microscopy data from: Endoplasmic reticulum stress activates human IRE1α through reversible assembly of inactive dimers into small oligomers, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.t4b8gtj33

Abstract

Protein folding homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is regulated by a signaling network, termed the unfolded protein response (UPR). Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) is an ER membrane-resident kinase/RNase that mediates signal transmission in the most evolutionarily conserved branch of the UPR. Dimerization and/or higher-order oligomerization of IRE1 are thought to be important for its activation mechanism, yet the actual oligomeric states of inactive, active, and attenuated mammalian IRE1 complexes remained unknown. We developed an automated two-color single-molecule tracking approach to dissect the oligomerization of tagged endogenous human IRE1 in live cells. In contrast to previous models, our data indicate that IRE1 exists as a constitutive homodimer at baseline and assembles into small oligomers upon ER stress. We demonstrate that the formation of inactive dimers and stress-dependent oligomers is fully governed by IRE1’s lumenal domain. Phosphorylation of IRE1’s kinase domain occurs more slowly than oligomerization and is retained after oligomers disassemble back into dimers. Our findings suggest that assembly of IRE1 dimers into larger oligomers specifically enables trans- autophosphorylation, which in turn drives IRE1’s RNase activity.

 

Usage Notes

Please see the attached Readme file, as well as the detailed README.md file distributed with the associated analysis code repository.

Funding