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Data from: Phylogenetics of moth-like butterflies (Papilionoidea: Hedylidae) based on a new 13-locus target capture probe set

Citation

Kawahara, Akito Y. et al. (2018), Data from: Phylogenetics of moth-like butterflies (Papilionoidea: Hedylidae) based on a new 13-locus target capture probe set, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.t5sd8c8

Abstract

The Neotropical moth-like butterflies (Hedylidae) are perhaps the most unusual butterfly family. In addition to being species-poor, this family is predominantly nocturnal and has anti-bat ultrasound hearing organs. Evolutionary relationships among the 36 described species are largely unexplored. A 13-gene anchored hybrid enrichment probe set (‘BUTTERFLY2.0’), that includes standard markers used in butterfly phylogenetics, captured sequences from decades-old museum specimens, and appears to be a cost-effective technique to infer phylogenetic relationships of the butterfly tree of life. Our dataset comprises up to 10,898 aligned base pairs from each of the 22 species of Hedylidae and 19 outgroups. Eleven of the thirteen loci were captured from 100% of the taxa, and the remaining loci were captured from ≥94% of taxa. The inferred phylogeny had robust support at 80% of nodes. Our results are consistent with morphological work, with Macrosoma tipulata sister to all remaining hedylids, followed by M. semiermis sister to the remaining species in the genus. We tested the hypothesis that nocturnality evolved only once from diurnality in Hedylidae, and showed that the ancestral condition was likely diurnal, with a shift to nocturnality early in the diversification of this family.

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Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB 1541500, 1541557, and 1541560