Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Compound- and context-dependent effects of antibiotics on greenhouse gas emissions from livestock

Citation

Danielsson, Rebecca et al. (2019), Data from: Compound- and context-dependent effects of antibiotics on greenhouse gas emissions from livestock, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.t7f3rc8

Abstract

The use of antibiotics in livestock production may trigger ecosystem disservices, including increased emissions of greenhouse gases. To evaluate this, we conducted two separate animal experiments, administering two widely used antibiotic compounds (benzylpenicillin and tetracycline) over a 4 or 5-day period locally and/or systemically. We then recorded enteric methane production, total gas production from dung decomposing under aerobic versus anaerobic conditions, prokaryotic community composition in rumen and dung, and accompanying changes in nutrient intake, rumen fermentation, and digestibility resulting from antibiotic administration in dairy cows. The focal antibiotics had no detectable effect on gas emissions from enteric fermentation or dung in aerobic conditions, while it decreased total gas production from anaerobic dung. Microbiome-level effects of benzylpenicillin proved markedly different from those previously recorded for tetracycline. Antibiotic effects on gas production differed substantially between dung maintained under aerobic versus anaerobic conditions and between compounds, but not by mode of administration, under anaerobic conditions. These findings demonstrate compound- and context-dependent impacts of antibiotics on methane emissions and underlying processes, and highlight the need for a global synthesis of data on agricultural antibiotic use before we can understand their climatic impacts.

Usage Notes

Location

Umeå
Sweden
Jokioinen
Finland
Viikki