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Data from: Adaptation of diploid and tetraploid Chamerion angustifolium to elevation but not local environment

Citation

Martin, Sara Lauretta; Husband, Brian C. (2013), Data from: Adaptation of diploid and tetraploid Chamerion angustifolium to elevation but not local environment, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.t8q3k

Abstract

Polyploid organisms often have different geographic ranges than their diploid relatives. However, it is unclear whether this divergence is maintained by adaptation or results from historical differences in colonization. Here we conducted a reciprocal transplant experiment with diploid and autotetraploid Chamerion angustifolium to test for adaptation at the ploidy and population level. In the Rocky Mountains, pure diploid populations occur at high elevations and pure autotetraploid populations occur at low elevations with mixed-ploidy populations between. We planted 3134 seedlings in 2004 and 3890 juveniles (bolting) in 2005 among nine plots, three in each of the diploid, mixed-ploidy and tetraploid zones, and monitored survival until 2008. For both seedlings and juvenile plants, elevation significantly influenced survival. The juvenile plants also showed a significant ploidy by elevation interaction, indicating that diploids and tetraploids survived best at their native elevations. In contrast, we found no evidence of local adaptation to plot within elevation. This suggests that the current distribution of diploids and tetraploids across elevations is the result of adaptation and that genome duplication may have facilitated the invasion of lower elevation habitats by limiting the movement of maladapted alleles from diploid populations at higher elevations.

Usage Notes

Location

Alberta
British Columbia
Canadian Rocky Mountains