Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: From microsatellites to single nucleotide polymorphisms for the genetic monitoring of a critically endangered sturgeon

Citation

Roques, Séverine et al. (2019), Data from: From microsatellites to single nucleotide polymorphisms for the genetic monitoring of a critically endangered sturgeon, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.t9v70p3

Abstract

The use of genetic information is crucial in conservation programs for the establishment of breeding plans and for the evaluation of restocking success. Short tandem repeats (STRs) have been the most widely used molecular markers in such programs, but next-generation sequencing approaches have prompted the transition to genome-wide markers such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Until now, most sturgeon species have been monitored using STRs. The low diversity found in the critically endangered European sturgeon (Acipenser sturio), however, makes its future genetic monitoring challenging and the current resolution needs to be increased. Here, we describe the discovery of a highly informative set of 79 SNPs using Double Digest Restriction Associated DNA (ddRAD) sequencing and its validation by genotyping using the MassArray system. Comparing with STRs, the SNP panel proved to be highly efficient and reproducible, allowing for more accurate parentage and kinship assignments’ on 195 juveniles of known pedigree and 40 wild-born adults. We explore the effectiveness of both markers to estimated relatedness and inbreeding, using simulated and empirical datasets. Interestingly, we found significant correlations between STRs and SNPs at individual heterozygosity and inbreeding that give support to a reasonable representation of whole genome diversity for both markers. These results are useful for the conservation program of A. sturio in building a comprehensive studbook, which will optimize conservation strategies. This approach also proves suitable for other case studies in which highly discriminatory genetic markers are needed to assess parentage and kinship.

Usage Notes

Location

Europe