Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Plasticity versus evolutionary divergence: what causes habitat partitioning in urban-adapted birds?

Citation

Martin, Paul; Burke, Kevin; Bonier, Frances (2020), Data from: Plasticity versus evolutionary divergence: what causes habitat partitioning in urban-adapted birds?, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.tht76hdx3

Abstract

Habitat partitioning can facilitate the coexistence of closely related species, and often results from competitive interference inducing plastic shifts of subordinate species in response to aggressive, dominant species (plasticity), or the evolution of ecological differences in subordinate species that reduce their ability to occupy habitats where the dominant species occurs (evolutionary divergence). Evidence consistent with both plasticity and evolutionary divergence exist, but the relative contributions of each to habitat partitioning have been difficult to discern. Here we use a global dataset on the breeding occurrence of birds in cities to test predictions of these alternative hypotheses to explain previously described habitat partitioning associated with competitive interference. Consistent with plasticity, the presence of behaviorally dominant congeners in a city was associated with a 65% reduction in occurrence of subordinate species, but only when the dominant was a widespread breeder in urban habitats. Consistent with evolutionary divergence, increased range-wide overlap with dominant congeners was associated with a 56% reduction in occurrence of subordinates in cities, even when the dominant was absent from the city. Overall, our results suggest that both plasticity and evolutionary divergence play important, concurrent roles in habitat partitioning among closely related species in urban environments.

Methods

Please see manuscript for details.

Usage Notes

Please see ReadMe file for description of data.

Funding

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Award: RGPIN/04452-2018