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Data from: Geographic variation in corticosterone response to chronic predator stress in tadpoles

Citation

Dahl, Emma; Orizaola, Germán; Winberg, Svante; Laurila, Anssi (2012), Data from: Geographic variation in corticosterone response to chronic predator stress in tadpoles, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.tk553840

Abstract

Chronic stress often affects growth and development negatively and these effects are often mediated via glucocorticoid hormones, which elevate during stress. We investigated latitudinal variation in corticosterone (CORT)-response to chronic predator stress in Rana temporaria tadpoles along a 1500 km latitudinal cline in Sweden tadpoles, in a laboratory experiment. We hypothesised that more time-constrained high-latitude populations have evolved a lower CORT-response to chronic stress to maintain higher growth under stressful conditions. Southern tadpoles had higher CORT-content in response to predators after one day of exposure, whereas there was no increase in CORT in the northern populations. Two weeks later there were no predator-induced CORT elevations. Artificially elevated CORT levels strongly decreased growth, development and survival in both northern and southern tadpoles. We suggest that the lower CORT-response in high-latitude populations can be connected with avoidance of CORT-mediated reduction in growth and development, but also discuss other possible explanations.

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