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Data from: Perceived threat to paternity reduces likelihood of paternal provisioning in house wrens

Citation

DiSciullo, Rachael A.; Thompson, Charles F.; Sakaluk, Scott K. (2019), Data from: Perceived threat to paternity reduces likelihood of paternal provisioning in house wrens, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.v3b36nh

Abstract

Biparental care is a critical and, occasionally, unequally shared obligation that ensures that young survive to maturity. Such care may be complicated in systems in which one parent, typically the male, is unsure of his genetic relatedness to the young. Males may reduce paternal provisioning when full paternity is not assured, as occurs in mating systems in which females engage in extra-pair copulations. Moreover, other factors independent of extra-pair matings, such as male personality traits, likely also affect the level of paternal care. In this study, we determined the effect of a paternity threat event (i.e., a conspecific or a heterospecific territory intrusion) and male personality (i.e., the level of aggressiveness) on provisioning effort by male house wrens (Troglodytes aedon). Males were more likely to attack a conspecific intruder than a heterospecific intruder. Males that were exposed to a conspecific intruder were less likely to provision young at all. Of those males that did feed the young in their nest, male aggressiveness did not relate to feeding effort. These findings suggest that the likelihood of paternal care is reduced by perceived threats to paternity, but that the costs of not feeding potentially multi-sired young are high and feeding efforts are unrelated to male personality.

Usage Notes

Location

Mackinaw study area
Illinois
central Illinois
Lexington