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Data from: Developing the global potential of citizen science: assessing opportunities that benefit people, society and the environment in East Africa

Citation

Pocock, Michael J. O. et al. (2019), Data from: Developing the global potential of citizen science: assessing opportunities that benefit people, society and the environment in East Africa, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.v6028g3

Abstract

1. Citizen science is gaining increasing prominence as a tool for science and engagement but has little visibility in many developing countries, despite being a potentially valuable tool for sustainable development. 2. We undertook a collaborative prioritization process with experts in conservation and the environment to assess the potential of environmental citizen science in East Africa including its opportunities, benefits and barriers. This provided principles that are applicable across developing countries, particularly for large-scale citizen science. 3. We found that there was great potential for citizen science to add to our scientific knowledge of natural resources and biodiversity trends. Many of the important benefits of citizen science were for people, as well as the environment directly. Major barriers to citizen science were mostly social and institutional, although projects should also consider access to suitable technology and language barriers. 4. Policy implications. Citizen science can provide data to support decision-making and reporting against international targets. Participation can provide societal benefits, informing and empowering people, thus supporting the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. In developing countries there needs to be innovation to develop culturally-relevant citizen science benefitting participants and end-users. This should be supported through regional networks of stakeholders for sharing best practice.

Usage Notes

Location

Eastern Africa
Tanzania
Uganda
Kenya