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Data from: Assessing stable isotope dynamics of diapausing Calanus finmarchicus and C. hyperboreus during the overwintering period: a laboratory experiment

Citation

Perrin, G.; Dibacco, C.; Plourde, S.; Winkler, G. (2014), Data from: Assessing stable isotope dynamics of diapausing Calanus finmarchicus and C. hyperboreus during the overwintering period: a laboratory experiment, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.vb5pj

Abstract

This study aimed at describing changes in the stable isotopic composition of late copepodite stage V (CV) subarctic marine copepods (Calanus finmarchicus and C. hyperboreus) during overwintering non-feeding periods. Diapausing stage CVs sampled in deep waters of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (Québec, Canada) in late-September 2009 were monitored for 4 months under controlled laboratory conditions. CVs and newly moulted adults were analyzed for δ13C and δ15N signatures as well as lipid, carbon and nitrogen content. Lipids were extracted in half of the samples to compare δ13C of individuals with and without lipids and to evaluate the accuracy of mass balance correction models for δ13C under lipid influence. Lipid content generally decreased with time for both species, which was reflected in an increase of δ13C values of CVs but a constant δ13C in newly moulted adults. Accordingly, lipid extraction resulted in an increase of δ13C in CVs and adults. The mean δ13C signature of lipid-extracted individuals remained constant through the time for CVs of both species and for C. finmarchicus adults. δ15N signatures of individuals increased after lipid extraction, but this did not result in a constant value over time, suggesting that several endogenous metabolic processes affected nitrogen isotopic content. The accuracy of the mass balance model differed between species and stages, suggesting that lipid extraction should always be performed prior to applying mathematical corrections.

Usage Notes

Location

Canada
48.67N
68.58W
Lower St. Lawrence Estuary
Québec