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CESM 1.2 climate model simulation output for: The Essential Role of Westerly Wind Bursts in ENSO Dynamics and Extreme Events Quantified in Model 'Wind Stress Shaving' Experiments

Citation

Yu, Sungduk; Fedorov, Alexey (2022), CESM 1.2 climate model simulation output for: The Essential Role of Westerly Wind Bursts in ENSO Dynamics and Extreme Events Quantified in Model 'Wind Stress Shaving' Experiments, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.vhhmgqnxm

Abstract

Westerly wind bursts (WWBs)—brief but strong westerly wind anomalies in the equatorial Pacific—are believed to play an important role in El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) dynamics, but quantifying their effects is challenging. Here, we investigate the cumulative effects of WWBs on ENSO characteristics, including the occurrence of extreme El Niño events, via modified coupled model experiments within Community Earth System Model (CESM1) in which we progressively reduce the impacts of wind stress anomalies associated with model-generated WWBs. In these “wind stress shaving” experiments we limit momentum transfer from the atmosphere to the ocean above a preset threshold, thus “shaving off” wind bursts. To reduce the tropical Pacific mean state drift, both westerly and easterly wind bursts are removed, although the changes are dominated by WWB reduction. As we impose progressively stronger thresholds, both ENSO amplitude and the frequency of extreme El Niño decrease, and ENSO becomes less asymmetric. The warming center of El Niño shifts westward, indicating less frequent and weaker Eastern Pacific (EP) El Niño events. Removing most of wind bursts-related wind stress anomalies reduces ENSO amplitude by 22%. The essential role of WWBs in the development of extreme El Niño events is revealed in the suppressed eastward migration of the western Pacific warm pool and hence a weaker Bjerknes feedback under wind shaving. Overall, our results reaffirm the importance of WWBs in shaping the characteristics of ENSO and its extreme events and imply that WWB changes with global warming could influence future ENSO.

Funding

Yale University, Award: Todd Sandoz Gift

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Award: NNX17AH21G

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Award: NA20OAR4310377

U.S. Department of Energy, Award: DE-SC0023134