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Data from: Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq) panel development and application to minimally-invasive DNA samples to support studies in molecular ecology

Citation

Schmidt, Danielle et al. (2019), Data from: Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq) panel development and application to minimally-invasive DNA samples to support studies in molecular ecology, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.vr300p0

Abstract

Minimally-invasive sampling (MIS) is widespread in wildlife studies; however, its utility for massively parallel DNA sequencing (MPS) is limited. Poor sample quality and contamination by exogenous DNA can make MIS challenging to use with modern genotyping-by-sequencing approaches, which have been traditionally developed for high-quality DNA sources. Given that MIS is often more appropriate in many contexts, there is a need to make such samples practical for harnessing MPS. Here, we test the ability for Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq), a multiplex amplicon sequencing approach, to effectively genotype minimally-invasive cloacal DNA samples collected from the Western Rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus), a threatened species in British Columbia, Canada. As there was no previous genetic information for this species, an optimized panel of 362 SNPs was selected for use with GT-seq from a de novo restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) assembly. Comparisons of genotypes generated within and among RADseq and GT-seq for the same individuals found low rates of genotyping error (GT-seq: 0.50%; RADseq: 0.80%) and discordance (2.57%), the latter likely due to the different genotype calling models employed. GT-seq mean genotype discordance between blood and cloacal swab samples collected from the same individuals was also minimal (1.37%). Estimates of population diversity parameters were similar across GT-seq and RADseq datasets, as were inferred patterns of population structure. Overall, GT-seq can be effectively applied to low quality DNA samples, minimizing the inefficiencies presented by exogenous DNA typically found in minimally-invasive samples and continuing the expansion of molecular ecology and conservation genetics in the genomics era.

Usage Notes

Location

Canada
British Columbia