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Evaluation of Ortho VITROS and Roche Elecsys S and NC immunoassays for SARS-CoV-2 serosurveillance applications

Citation

Grebe, Eduard; Sulaeman, Hasan (2022), Evaluation of Ortho VITROS and Roche Elecsys S and NC immunoassays for SARS-CoV-2 serosurveillance applications, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.vt4b8gtwd

Abstract

SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence studies are instrumental in monitoring epidemic activity and require well-characterized, high-throughput assays, and appropriate testing algorithms. The U.S. Nationwide Blood Donor Seroprevalence Study performed monthly cross-sectional serological testing from July 2020 to December 2021, implementing evolving testing algorithms in response to changes in pandemic activity. With high vaccine uptake, anti-Spike (S) reactivity rates reached > 80% by May 2021, and the study pivoted from reflex Roche anti-nucleocapsid (NC) testing of Ortho S-reactive specimens to parallel Ortho S/NC testing. We evaluated the performance of the Ortho NC assay as a replacement for the Roche NC assay and compared performance of parallel S/NC testing on both platforms. Qualitative and quantitative agreement of Ortho NC with Roche NC assays was evaluated on pre-selected S/NC concordant and discordant specimens. All 190 Ortho S+/Roche NC+ specimens were reactive on the Ortho NC assay; 34% of 367 Ortho S+/Roche NC- specimens collected prior to vaccine availability and 43% of 37 Ortho S-/Roche NC+ specimens were reactive on the Ortho NC assay. Performance of parallel S/NC testing using Ortho and Roche platforms was evaluated on 200 specimens collected in 2019 and 3,903 study specimens collected in 2021. All 200 pre-COVID 2019 specimens tested negative on the four assays. Agreement of S and NC reactivity on specimens was 96.4% (3,769/3,903); most discordant results had reactivity close to the cutoffs on the alternate assays. These findings, and higher efficiency and throughput, support use of parallel S/NC testing on either Roche or Ortho platforms for large serosurveillance studies.

Funding

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Award: 75D30120C08170