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Data from: Population density and size influence pollen dispersal pattern and mating system of the predominantly outcrossed Banksia nivea (Proteaceae) in a threatened ecological community

Citation

Thavornkanlapachai, Rujiporn; Ladd, Philip G.; Byrne, Margaret (2018), Data from: Population density and size influence pollen dispersal pattern and mating system of the predominantly outcrossed Banksia nivea (Proteaceae) in a threatened ecological community, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.vt84640

Abstract

Gene flow is a critical component of plant mating systems and influences population fitness, yet pollen dispersal can be highly variable and influenced by natural and anthropogenic fragmentation. Gene flow through pollen dispersal was investigated in two populations of contrasting size and habitat context in Banksia nivea ssp. uliginosa, a rare species in the Busselton ironstone threatened ecological community with a naturally fragmented distribution. Paternity analysis was conducted with seven microsatellite loci to determine mating system parameters and patterns of pollen dispersal. Outcrossing was high in both populations with a similar level of selfing for both populations despite differences in population size, density and vegetation matrix. Most mating occurred within 10 m of a mother plant in the small, clumped population, while more dispersed mating, up to 50 m from a mother plant, was recorded in the large, less dense population. Our results show that population density and size are important influences on mating system parameters and level of pollen dispersal.

Usage Notes

Location

South Western Australia