Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Structural brain network abnormalities and the probability of seizure recurrence after epilepsy surgery: supplementary material

Citation

Sinha, Nishant et al. (2021), Structural brain network abnormalities and the probability of seizure recurrence after epilepsy surgery: supplementary material, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.vx0k6djnv

Abstract

Objective: We assessed pre-operative structural brain networks and clinical characteristics of patients with drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to identify correlates of post-surgical seizure recurrences.

Methods: We examined data from 51 TLE patients who underwent anterior temporal lobe resection (ATLR) and 29 healthy controls. For each patient, using the preoperative structural, diffusion, and post-operative structural MRI, we generated two networks: ‘pre-surgery’ network and ‘surgically-spared’ network. Standardising these networks with respect to controls, we determined the number of abnormal nodes before surgery and expected to be spared by surgery. We incorporated these 2 abnormality measures and 13 commonly acquired clinical data from each patient in a robust machine learning framework to estimate patient-specific chances of seizures persisting after surgery.   

Results: Patients with more abnormal nodes had lower chance of seizure freedom at 1 year and even if seizure-free at 1 year, were more likely to relapse within five years. In the surgically-spared networks of poor outcome patients, the number of abnormal nodes was greater and their locations more widespread than in good outcome patients. We achieved 0.84±0.06 AUC and 0.89±0.09 specificity in predicting unsuccessful seizure outcomes as opposed to complete seizure freedom at 1-year. Moreover, the model-predicted likelihood of seizure relapse was significantly correlated with the grade of surgical outcome at year-one and associated with relapses up-to five years post-surgery.

Conclusion: Node abnormality offers a personalised non-invasive marker, that can be combined with clinical data, to better estimate the chances of seizure freedom at 1 year, and subsequent relapse up to 5 years after ATLR.

Funding

Wellcome Trust, Award: 210109/Z/18/Z

Medical Research Council, Award: G0802012

Medical Research Council, Award: MR/M00841X/1