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Fovea-like photoreceptor specialisations underlie single UV-cone driven prey capture behaviour in zebrafish

Citation

Yoshimatsu, Takeshi et al. (2020), Fovea-like photoreceptor specialisations underlie single UV-cone driven prey capture behaviour in zebrafish, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.w0vt4b8n3

Abstract

In the eye, the function of same-type photoreceptors must be regionally adjusted to process a highly asymmetrical natural visual world. Here we show that UV-cones in the larval zebrafish area temporalis are specifically tuned for UV-bright prey capture in their upper frontal visual field, which uses the signal from a single cone at a time. For this, UV-detection efficiency is regionally boosted 42-fold. Next, in vivo 2-photon imaging, transcriptomics and computational modelling reveal that these cones use an elevated baseline of synaptic calcium to facilitate the encoding of bright objects, which in turn results from expressional tuning of phototransduction genes. Finally, this signal is further accentuated at the level of glutamate release driving retinal networks. These regional differences tally with variations between peripheral and foveal cones in primates and hint at a common mechanistic origin. Together, our results highlight a rich mechanistic toolkit for the tuning of neurons.

Methods

Tau was calculated by fitting exponential function to the recovery phase of calcium responses after the various intensity or duration of light flashes.

Funding

European Research Council, Award: ERC-StG “NeuroVisEco” 677687

UK Research and Innovation, Award: BB/R014817/1

UK Research and Innovation, Award: MC_PC_15071

German Ministry for Education and Research, Award: 01GQ1601

German Ministry for Education and Research, Award: 01IS18052C

Leverhulme Trust, Award: PLP-2017-005

The Lister Institute for Preventive Medicine

Marie Curie Sklodowska Actions individual fellowship, Award: “ColourFish” 748716

Marie Curie Sklodowska Actions individual fellowship, Award: “ColourFish” 748716