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Data from: Population genomics and history of speciation reveal fishery management gaps in two related redfish species (Sebastes mentella and Sebastes fasciatus)

Citation

Benestan, Laura (2021), Data from: Population genomics and history of speciation reveal fishery management gaps in two related redfish species (Sebastes mentella and Sebastes fasciatus), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.w0vt4b8n7

Abstract

Understanding the processes shaping population structure and reproductive isolation of marine organisms can improve their management and conservation. Using genomic markers combined with estimation of individual ancestries, assignment tests, spatial ecology, and demographic modelling, we (i) characterized the contemporary population structure, (ii) assessed the influence of space, fishing depth and sampling years on contemporary distribution, and (iii) reconstructed the speciation history of two cryptic redfish species, Sebastes mentella and S. fasciatus. We genotyped 860 individuals in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean using 24,603 filtered single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our results confirmed the clear genetic distinctiveness of the two species, and identified three ecotypes within S. mentella and five populations in S. fasciatus. Multivariate analyses highlighted the influence of spatial distribution and depth on the overall genomic variation while demographic modeling revealed that secondary contact models best explained inter and intra genomic divergence. These species, ecotypes, and populations can be considered as a rare and wide continuum of genomic divergence in the marine environment. This acquired knowledge pertaining to the evolutionary processes driving population divergence and reproductive isolation will help optimizing the assessment of demographic units and possibly, to refine fishery management units.

Methods

Samples collected by the Department of Fishery and Ocean Canada.

RAD-sequencing libraries prepared in Université LAVAL.

Funding

Research and Development

Fisheries and Oceans Canada