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Characteristics of households that were interviewed in a study that investigated factors driving tree species in cocoa farms in Cote d'Ivoire

Citation

Atangana, Alain R (2020), Characteristics of households that were interviewed in a study that investigated factors driving tree species in cocoa farms in Cote d'Ivoire, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.w9ghx3fn7

Abstract

1. Intensive cocoa production in Côte d’Ivoire, the World’s leading cocoa producer, has grown at the expense of forest cover. To reverse this trend, the country has adopted a ‘zero deforestation’ agricultural policy and committed to rehabilitate its forest cover through the planting of high-value tree species in cocoa landscapes using a participatory approach. However, less is known on the factors influencing farmers’ introduction of high-value tree species in cocoa landscapes.

2. We tested the hypothesis that ten factors previously reported to influence agroforestry systems adoption predict the number and choice of tree species that farmers introduce in cocoa farms. We interviewed 683 households in the cocoa-producing zone of Côte d’Ivoire and counted tree species in their cocoa farms.

3. On average two tree species were recorded per surveyed farm. Generalized Poisson regression models revealed that cocoa production area, experience in tree planting and expected benefits influence tree species introduction through planting or ‘retention’ when clearing land for cocoa establishment. Age of farmer also influenced (P = 0.017) farmers’ tree species planting in cocoa farms. Few tree species were introduced in current intensive cocoa-production areas than in ‘old cocoa-loop’ and forested areas. The number of tree species introduced in cocoa farms increased with expected benefits and experience in tree planting. The number of planted tree species also increased with farmers’ age. Tree species were mostly selected for provision of shade to cocoa, production of useful tree products (38%) and income from the sale of these products (7%). Fruit tree species were the most planted while timber tree species were mostly spared when clearing land for cocoa production.

Synthesis and applications. Agroforestry is gaining momentum in Côte d’Ivoire, as public and private institutions including the World Agroforestry Centre are developing and deploying multi-strata cocoa-based agroforestry systems. The results of the present study can guide the design and implementation of biodiverse cocoa-based agroforestry in the cocoa-producing zones of the country

Methods

A questionnaire was used to interviewed 683 cocoa households in the cocoa-producing zone of Cote d'Ivoire. Households were sampled using systematic sampling as described by Zinger (1963). The number of tree species were also counted in the cocoa farms of interviewees and recorded.

Funding

Cémoi

Conseil du Café Cacao de Cote d'Ivoire

Cémoi

Conseil du Café Cacao de Cote d'Ivoire