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Genome-wide supermatrix analyses of maples (Acer, Sapindaceae) reveal recurring inter-continental migration, mass extinction, and rapid lineage divergence

Citation

Areces-Berazain, Fabiola; Hinsinger, Damien D.; Strijk, Joeri S. (2021), Genome-wide supermatrix analyses of maples (Acer, Sapindaceae) reveal recurring inter-continental migration, mass extinction, and rapid lineage divergence, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.wm37pvmmh

Abstract

Acer (Sapindaceae) is an exceptional study system for understanding the evolutionary history, divergence, and assembly of broad-leaved deciduous forests at higher latitudes. Maples stand out due to their high diversity, disjunct distribution pattern across the northern continents, and rich fossil record dating back to the Paleocene. Using a genome-wide supermatrix combining plastomes and nuclear sequences (~585 kb) for 110 Acer taxa, we built a robust time-calibrated hypothesis investigating the evolution of maples, inferring ancestral ranges, reconstructing diversification rates over time, and exploring the impact of mass-extinction on lineage accumulation. Contrary to fossil evidence, our results indicate Acer first originated in the (north)eastern Palearctic region, which acted as a source for recurring outward migration. Warm conditions favored rapid Eocene-onward divergence, but ranges and diversity declined extensively as a result of the Plio-Pleistocene glacial cycles. These signals in genome-wide sequence data corroborate paleobotanical evidence for other major woody north-temperate groups, highlighting the significant (disparate) impact of climatic changes on the evolution, composition, and distribution of the vegetation in the northern hemisphere.

Usage Notes

This data file includes the DNA sequence alignment used in the analyses of the paper cited above.

Funding

Bagui Scholarship of Gaungxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Award: C33600992001