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Genomic population structure of sympatric sexual and asexual populations in a parasitic wasp, Meteorus pulchricornis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), inferred from six hundred single-nucleotide polymorphism loci

Citation

Wachi, Nakatada et al. (2021), Genomic population structure of sympatric sexual and asexual populations in a parasitic wasp, Meteorus pulchricornis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), inferred from six hundred single-nucleotide polymorphism loci, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.x3ffbg7hn

Abstract

In spite of the two-fold reproductive advantage, asexual reproduction is not common in nature, likely due to the associated genetic deterioration or reduced genetic variation. To understand how genetic diversity is maintained in existing asexual populations, we investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of sympatric sexual and asexual populations of a parasitic wasp, Meteorus pulchricornis, using 614 genome-wide loci with single nucleotide polymorphisms. The genetic structures of the apomictic asexual populations were distinct, showing considerable genetic differentiation among them. Most of the asexual populations were highly differentiated from the sympatric sexual population, some asexual individuals could not be distinguished from members of the sexual population. Furthermore, significantly fewer multilocus genotypes were identified in the asexual populations (1–7) compared to the sexual population (42), which is consistent with their apomictic nature. The observed patterns of fixed heterozygous sites suggest that major asexual populations had the same evolutionary origin and have long since evolved individually; while the detected gene flow between the sexual population and minor asexual population may indicate independent origins of asexuality. The potential role of occasional males in apomictic wasps is also discussed in the study.

Methods

Data derived from 614 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci obtained using multiplexed inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) genotyping via sequencing (MIG-seq), and obtained by analysis using PYRAD. 

Input data and intermediate output for analysis using ADMIXTURE, ARLEQUIN, BAYESASS, FINERADSTRUCTURE and GENODIVE.

Usage Notes

All input data (containing missing loci and individuals), parameter files or population file and intermediate output are provided.

Funding

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: 17K19268

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: 19H00942