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Data from: Applied use of alternate stable state modeling in restoration ecology

Citation

Zweig, Christa; Newman, Sue; Saunders, Colin (2020), Data from: Applied use of alternate stable state modeling in restoration ecology, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.x95x69pfb

Abstract

The concept of alternate stable states is important in ecological theory and models, but the application and implementation of these models have the potential to make significant future advances in the field of patterned landscapes. The bi-stable, ridge and slough landscape is a central feature of Everglades restoration and provides an important opportunity to test stable state theory with multistate transition models. We used these models to estimate environmental parameters associated with state changes (water depths, edaphic factors, etc.) to develop a quantitative method to measure resilience and stability. The multistate model indicates that long-term, local hydrology (15-year mean maximums and 15-year mean amplitude) and edaphic factors control the local scale shifts between ridge and slough states. We show that multistate models can provide hydrologic envelopes for managers, produce a tool to help assess future water management scenarios, and address issues of sustainability, resilience, and restoration for any bi-stable system.