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Data from: Animal models to understand the etiology and pathophysiology in polycystic ovary syndrome

Citation

Stener-Victorin, Elisabet et al. (2020), Data from: Animal models to understand the etiology and pathophysiology in polycystic ovary syndrome, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.zgmsbcc75

Abstract

More than one out of ten women worldwide are diagnosed with the leading cause of female reproductive and metabolic dysfunction, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Despite its high prevalence, PCOS and its accompanying morbidities are likely under-diagnosed, averaging >2 years and 3 physicians changes before women are diagnosed. Despite intensive research, the underlying cause(s) of PCOS have yet to be defined. In order to understand PCOS pathophysiology, its developmental origins, and how to predict and prevent PCOS onset, there is urgent need for safe and effective markers and treatments. In this review, we detail which animal models are more suitable and which are less suitable for contributing to our understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of PCOS. We summarize and highlight advantages and limitations of hormonal or genetic manipulation of animal models, as well as of naturally occurring PCOS-like females.

Methods

See review article

Funding

Swedish Medical Research Council, Award: 2018-02435

Novo Nordisk Foundation, Award: NNF19OC0056647

National Institutes of Health, Award: HD041098,HD044232,P50HD071836,HD044405,HD028934,OD011106,DK121559

European Research Council, Award: ERC-2016-CoG,725149/REPRODAMH

National Health and Medical Research Council, Award: APP1022648,APP1158540

Health Research Council of New Zealand, Award: 18-671

Stockholm County Council and Karolinska Institutet

Royal Society Marsden Fund, Award: 17-64