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Data from: Responses of population structure and genomic diversity to climate change and fishing pressure in a pelagic fish

Cite this dataset

Mendoza-Portillo, Verónica; García-De León, Francisco J.; von der Heyden, Sophie (2024). Data from: Responses of population structure and genomic diversity to climate change and fishing pressure in a pelagic fish [Dataset]. Dryad. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.zgmsbccd1

Abstract

The responses of marine species to environmental changes and anthropogenic pressures (e.g. fishing) interact with ecological and evolutionary processes that are not well understood. Knowledge of changes in the distribution range and genetic diversity of species and their populations into the future is essential for the conservation and sustainable management of resources. Almaco jack (Seriola rivoliana) is a pelagic fish with high importance to fisheries and aquaculture in the Pacific Ocean. In this study, we assessed contemporary genomic diversity and structure in loci that are putatively under selection (outlier loci) and determined their potential functions.  Utilizing a combination of genotype-environment association, spatial distribution models, and demogenetic simulations, we modeled the effects of climate change (under three different RCP scenarios) and fishing pressure on the species’ geographic distribution and genomic diversity and structure to 2050 and 2100. Our results show that most of the outlier loci identified were related to biological and metabolic processes that may be associated with temperature and salinity. Contemporary genomic structure showed three populations—two in the Eastern Pacific (Cabo San Lucas and Eastern Pacific) and one in the Central Pacific (Hawaii). Future projections suggest a loss of suitable habitat and potential range contractions for most scenarios, while fishing pressure decreased population connectivity. Our results suggest that future climate change scenarios and fishing pressure will affect the genomic structure and genotypic composition of S. rivoliana and lead to loss of genomic diversity in populations distributed in the eastern-central Pacific Ocean, which could have profound effects in fisheries that depend on this resource.

Funding

Secretariat of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food, Award: 2505161165