Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Knowledge, provision of information and barriers to high quality medication abortion provision by pharmacists in Uttar Pradesh, India

Citation

Diamond-Smith, Nadia et al. (2020), Data from: Knowledge, provision of information and barriers to high quality medication abortion provision by pharmacists in Uttar Pradesh, India, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.7272/Q63F4MT6

Abstract

Background: Almost three quarters of the 16 millions abortions in India were medication abortion (MA) purchased outside of facilities. Past research has shown low quality of care given to clients seeking MA from pharmacists in this setting. Most purchasers of MA from pharmacies in India are men, further complicating the pathway to high quality information for women taking MA. Developing interventions that can improve the information and quality of interactions for women obtaining MA through this channel is critical. 

Objectives: The objective of this study was to measure the impact of an informational pamphlet given to pharmacists providing medication abortion on provider knowledge and behaviors The study was conducted in three districts of Uttar Pradesh India in and around Lucknow in 2018.  

Study Design: Pre intervention surveys were conducted with 283 pharmacists about knowledge and practices around MA. Half of the pharmacists were then provided with a 2 page informational and pictorial pamphlet. About 6 months after the baseline survey, pharmacists were again asked to complete a similar survey. At the time of recruitment, pharmacists were asked to provide consent for a mystery client to visit their shop in the next 6 months. About 3-4 months after the baseline, 1 of 4 mystery client profiles visited 111 pharmacists (both intervention and control). Mystery clients presented as 4 profiles (unmarried woman, unmarried man, married woman and married man) purchasing MA.

Findings: Pharmacists had overall low knowledge about dosing, timing, side effects and complications for MA. The intervention improved pharmacists knowledge of a variety of quality indicators, but did not change their self reported practices or behaviors (Mystery client data). Pharmacists provided lower quality information to mystery clients presenting as women (compared to men), especially young, unmarried women. 

Conclusions: Intervening to change behaviors among pharmacists is challenging and must address both knowledge but also behavior change, including stigma and biases. 

Methods

Mixed methods (pre/post survey and mystery clients)

Funding

David and Lucile Packard Foundation