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Simulation and nurse-mentoring in a statewide nurse mentoring program in Bihar, India: diagnosis of postpartum hemorrhage and intrapartum asphyxia

Citation

Ghosh, Rakesh (2022), Simulation and nurse-mentoring in a statewide nurse mentoring program in Bihar, India: diagnosis of postpartum hemorrhage and intrapartum asphyxia , Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.7272/Q6VQ30X9

Abstract

Background: Mentoring programs that include simulation, bedside mentoring, and didactic components are becoming increasingly popular to improve quality. These programs are designed with little evidence to inform the ideal composition of mentoring activities that would yield the greatest impact on provider skills and patient outcomes. We examined the association of number of maternal and neonatal emergency simulations performed with the diagnosis of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) and intrapartum asphyxia in real patients.

Method: Prospective cohort. Between- and within-facility comparisons over time.

Setting: 320 public facilities in the state of Bihar, India May 2015 – 2017.

Participants: Deliveries and livebirths.

Interventions: Mobile nurse-mentoring program with simulations, teamwork and communication activities, didactic teaching, demonstrations of clinical procedures and bedside mentoring including conducting deliveries. Nurse mentor pairs visited each facility for one week, covering four facilities over a four-week period, for seven to nine consecutive months.

Outcome measures: Diagnosis of PPH and intrapartum asphyxia.

Results: Relative to the bottom one-third facilities that performed the fewest maternal simulations, facilities in the middle one-third group diagnosed 26% (IRR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.59) more cases of PPH in real patients. Similarly, facilities in the middle one-third group, diagnosed 25% (IRR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.50) more cases of intrapartum asphyxia relative to the bottom third group that did the fewest neonatal simulations. Facilities in the top one-third group (i.e., performed the most simulations) did not have a significant difference in diagnosis of both outcomes, relative to the bottom one-third group.

Conclusion: Findings suggest a complex relationship between performing simulations and opportunities for direct practice with patients, and there may be an optimal balance in performing the two that would maximize diagnosis of PPH and intrapartum asphyxia.

Funding