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Data from: Tropical forest restoration enriches vascular epiphyte recovery

Citation

Reid, John Leighton; Chaves-Fallas, José Miguel; Holl, Karen D.; Zahawi, Rakan A. (2016), Data from: Tropical forest restoration enriches vascular epiphyte recovery, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.7291/D1J679

Abstract

Vascular epiphytes constitute a large proportion of tropical forest plant biodiversity, but are among the slowest plants to recolonize secondary forests. We asked whether tree planting for ecological restoration accelerates epiphyte community recovery. Does the spatial configuration of tree planting matter? What landscape contexts are most suitable for epiphyte restoration?

Location: Restored pastures in premontane Coto Brus County, Puntarenas, Costa Rica.

Methods

We surveyed vascular epiphyte species growing on the lower trunks of 1083 trees in thirteen experimental restoration sites in southern Costa Rica. Each site contained three 0.25-ha treatment plots: natural regeneration, trees planted in patches or "islands", and tree plantations. Sites spanned elevational (1100-1430 m) and deforestation gradients (4-94% forest cover within a 100-m radius around each site).

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB 09-18112

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB 14-56520