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Data from: Coalescent models characterize sources and demographic history of recent round goby colonization of Great Lakes and inland waters

Citation

Sard, Nicholas et al. (2019), Data from: Coalescent models characterize sources and demographic history of recent round goby colonization of Great Lakes and inland waters, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2v7s52d

Abstract

The establishment and spread of aquatic invasive species is ecologically and economically harmful and a source of conservation concern internationally. Processes of species invasion have traditionally been inferred from observational data of species presence/absence and relative abundance. However, genetic-based approaches can provide valuable sources of inference. Restriction-site associated DNA sequencing was used to identify and genotype single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci for Round Gobies (Neogobius melanostomus) (N=440) from 18 sampling locations in the Great Lakes and in three Michigan, USA drainages (Flint, Au Sable, and Cheboygan River basins). Sampled rivers differed in size, accessibility, and physical characteristics including man-made dispersal barriers. Population levels of genetic diversity and inter-population variance in SNP allele frequency were used in coalescence-based Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) to statistically compare models representing competing hypotheses regarding source population, post-colonization dispersal, and demographic history in the Great Lakes and inland waters. Results indicate different patterns of colonization across the three drainages. In the Flint River, models indicate a strong population bottleneck (< 3% of contemporary effective population size) and a single founding event from Saginaw Bay led to the colonization of inland river segments. In the Au Sable River, analyses could not distinguish potential source populations, but supported models indicated multiple introductions from one source population. In the Cheboygan River, supported models indicated that colonization likely proceeded from east (Lake Huron source) to west among inland locales sampled in the system. Despite the recent occupancy of Great Lakes and inland habitats, large numbers of loci analyzed in an ABC framework enable statistically supported identification of source populations and reconstruction of the direction of inland spread and demographic history following establishment. Information from analyses can direct management actions to limit the spread of invasive species from identified sources and most probable vectors into additional inland aquatic habitats.

Usage Notes

Location

Laurentian great lakes basin