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Data from: Haldane’s rule revisited: do hybrid females have a shorter lifespan? Survival of hybrids in a recent contact zone between two large gull species

Citation

Neubauer, Grzegorz; Nowicki, Piotr; Zagalska-Neubauer, Magdalena (2014), Data from: Haldane’s rule revisited: do hybrid females have a shorter lifespan? Survival of hybrids in a recent contact zone between two large gull species, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.n82p9

Abstract

Haldane’s rule predicts that particularly high fitness reduction should affect the heterogametic sex of interspecific hybrids. Despite the fact that hybridization is widespread in birds, survival of hybrid individuals is rarely addressed in studies of avian hybrid zones, possibly because of methodological constraints. Here, having applied capture-mark-recapture models to an extensive, 19-year-long dataset on individually marked birds, we estimate annual survival rates of hybrid individuals in the hybrid zone between herring (Larus argentatus) and Caspian (L. cachinnans) gulls. In both parental species, males have a slightly higher survival rate than females (model-weighted mean ± SE: herring gull males 0.88 ± 0.01, females 0.87 ± 0.01, Caspian gull males 0.88 ± 0.01, females 0.87 ± 0.01). Hybrid males do not survive for a shorter time than non-hybrid ones (0.88 ± 0.01), whereas hybrid females have the lowest survival rate among all groups of individuals (0.83 ± 0.03). This translates to a shorter adult (reproductive) lifespan (on average by 1.7-1.8 years, i.e. ca 25%) compared to non-hybrid females. We conclude that, in line with Haldane’s rule, the lower survival rate of female hybrids may contribute to selection against hybrids in this hybrid zone.

Usage Notes

Location

Europe
Poland