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Data from: De novo assembly and characterization of the skeletal muscle and electric organ transcriptomes of the African weakly-electric fish Campylomormyrus compressirostris (Mormyridae, Teleostei)

Citation

Lamanna, Francesco; Kirschbaum, Frank; Tiedemann, Ralph (2014), Data from: De novo assembly and characterization of the skeletal muscle and electric organ transcriptomes of the African weakly-electric fish Campylomormyrus compressirostris (Mormyridae, Teleostei), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.ns135

Abstract

African weakly electric-fishes (Mormyridae) underwent an outstanding adaptive radiation (about 200 species), putatively owing to their ability to communicate through species-specific weak electric signals. The electric organ discharge (EOD) is produced by muscle-derived electrocytes organized in piles to form an electric organ. Despite the importance of this trait as a pre-zygotic isolation mechanism, genomic resources remained limited. We present here a first draft of the skeletal muscle and electric organ transcriptomes from the weakly-electric fish species Campylomormyrus compressirostris, obtained using the Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing technology. Approximately 6.8 Gbp of cDNA sequence data were produced from both tissues, resulting in 57,268,109 raw reads for the skeletal muscle and 46,934,923 for the electric organ, and assembled de novo into 46,143 and 89,270 contigs, respectively. About 50% of both transcriptomes were annotated after protein databases search. The two transcriptomes show similar profiles in terms of Gene Ontology categories composition. We identified several candidate genes which are likely to play a central role in the production and evolution of the electric signal. For most of these genes, and for many other housekeeping genes, we were able to obtain the complete or partial coding DNA sequences (CDS), which can be used for the development of primers to be utilized in qRT-PCR experiments. We present also the complete mitochondrial genome and compare it to those available from other weakly-electric species. Additionally we located 1671 SSR containing regions with their flanking sites and designed the relative primers. The present study establishes a first step in the development of genomic tools aimed at understanding the role of electric-communication during speciation.

Usage Notes

Location

Congo River