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Data from: Effects of contemporary shifts of range margins on patterns of genetic structure and mating system in two coastal plant species

Citation

Latron, Mathilde et al. (2019), Data from: Effects of contemporary shifts of range margins on patterns of genetic structure and mating system in two coastal plant species, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3m6917t

Abstract

Species’ geographical ranges are often restricted due to niche limitation resulting in geographical isolation and reduced population size at range margins. Under the ‘abundant center’ paradigm, static marginal populations are thus expected to show higher genetic differentiation and lower genetic diversity than core populations. Low mate availability may also drive shifts towards higher propensity for selfing in geographically marginal populations. However, these predictions remain to be validated for contemporary range shifts occurring under current environmental change. This study is devoted to bridging this gap and assesses the spatial patterns of genetic structure and mating system across the geographical range of two coastal plant species characterized by contrasting contemporary range dynamics: the receding myrmecochorous Dune pansy (Viola tricolor subsp. curtisii) and the widespread expanding hydrochorous Rock samphire (Crithmum maritimum) Both species exhibited high propensity for selfing, with indications of inbreeding depression acting at early life stages. In Dune pansy, a biogeographical break was observed between core and marginal populations, with trailing-edge populations showing higher levels of genetic differentiation, reduced genetic diversity and higher levels of selfing estimated through progeny arrays. In contrast, genetic structuring was weak in Rock samphire and no clear spatial trends were observed in genetic diversity nor in mating system, likely the result of efficient long-distance seed dispersal by sea-surface currents. Our study highlights that key species differences in life-history traits related to dispersal and/or mate limitation modify the expectations of genetic diversity loss and mating system shift in contemporary range-expanding populations, as compared to historical core populations.

Usage Notes

Location

Coasts of Western Europe