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Data from: Assessing the ecosystem-level consequences of a small-scale artisanal kelp fishery within the context of climate-change

Citation

Krumhansl, Kira A.; Bergman, Jordanna N.; Salomon, Anne K. (2016), Data from: Assessing the ecosystem-level consequences of a small-scale artisanal kelp fishery within the context of climate-change, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.9j346

Abstract

Coastal communities worldwide rely on small-scale artisanal fisheries as a means of increasing food security and alleviating poverty. Even small-scale fishing activities, however, are prone to resource depletion and environmental degradation, which can erode livelihoods in the long run. Thus, there is a pressing need to identify viable and resilient artisanal fisheries, and generate knowledge to support management within the context of a rapidly changing climate. We examined the ecosystem-level consequences of an artisanal kelp fishery (Macrocystis pyrifera), finding minimal impacts of small-scale harvest on kelp recovery rates, survival, and biomass dynamics, and abundances of associated commercial and culturally important fish species. These results suggest that small-scale harvest poses minimal trade-offs for the other economic benefits provided by these ecosystems, and their inherent, spiritual, and cultural value to humans. However, we detected a negative impact of warmer seawater temperatures on kelp recovery rates following harvest, indicating that the viability of harvest, even at small scales, may be threatened by future increases in global ocean temperature. This suggests that negative impacts of artisanal fisheries may be more likely to arise in the context of a warming climate, further highlighting the widespread effects of global climate change on coastal fisheries and livelihoods.

Usage Notes

Location

British Columbia