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Data from: Quantifying genotype x environment effects in long-term common wheat yield trials from an agroecologically diverse production region

Citation

George, Nicholas; Lundy, Mark (2019), Data from: Quantifying genotype x environment effects in long-term common wheat yield trials from an agroecologically diverse production region, v2, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.bf8rt6b

Abstract

Multienvironment trials (METs) are used to investigate the performance of crop genotypes. To efficiently generate reliable performance estimates, the magnitude and patterns of genotype × environment interaction (G×E) in MET data must be known. We quantified G×E in fall-planted common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in California, with the goal of increasing the reliability and efficiency of statewide variety testing activities. Linear mixed models and the genotype main effects plus G×E interaction effects (GGE) biplot method were used to analyze MET data for 211 common wheat genotypes, the MET consisted of 9 locations and 14 seasons. The representativeness and discriminating power of the MET locations were tested, and estimates of the optimum number of test locations were made. The analyses did not find evidence for significant, repeatable, crossover G×E. The genotype and G×E effects were of a similar magnitude, and the G×E effects were relatively strong compared with other sources of variance but were dominated by seasonal effects, with potentially repeatable genotype-by-location (G×L) effects being relatively weak. The GGE analyses did not detect repeatable G×L patterns across seasons. As a result, we conclude that the cereal production regions of California consist of a single, but unstable, mega-environment for common wheat grain yield. The test location evaluation found few significant differences between test locations in terms of how well they represent the target production environment. We estimate that the number of test locations could be reduced while maintaining trial accuracy, which would improve the resource use efficiency of statewide trial activities without sacrificing information about variety-specific common wheat yield performance.

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