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Data from: Mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 and dental aberrations in children and adolescents with osteogenesis imperfecta - a retrospective cohort study

Citation

Andersson, Kristofer et al. (2018), Data from: Mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 and dental aberrations in children and adolescents with osteogenesis imperfecta - a retrospective cohort study, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.bp20k

Abstract

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of disorders of connective tissue, caused mainly by mutations in the collagen I genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2). Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and other dental aberrations are common features of OI. We investigated the association between collagen I mutations and DGI, taurodontism, and retention of permanent second molars in a retrospective cohort of 152 unrelated children and adolescents with OI. The clinical examination included radiographic evaluations. Teeth from 81 individuals were available for histopathological evaluation. COL1A1/2 mutations were found in 104 individuals by nucleotide sequencing. DGI was diagnosed clinically and radiographically in 29% of the individuals (44/152) and through isolated histological findings in another 19% (29/152). In the individuals with a COL1A1 mutation, 70% (7/10) of those with a glycine substitution located C-terminal of p.Gly305 exhibited DGI in both dentitions while no individual (0/7) with a mutation N-terminal of this point exhibited DGI in either dentition (p = 0.01). In the individuals with a COL1A2 mutation, 80% (8/10) of those with a glycine substitution located C terminal of p.Gly211 exhibited DGI in both dentitions while no individual (0/5) with a mutation N-terminal of this point (p = 0.007) exhibited DGI in either dentition. DGI was restricted to the deciduous dentition in 20 individuals. Seventeen had missense mutations where glycine to serine was the most prevalent substitution (53%). Taurodontism occurred in 18% and retention of permanent second molars in 31% of the adolescents. Dental aberrations are strongly associated with qualitatively changed collagen I. The varying expressivity of DGI is related to the location of the collagen I mutation. Genotype information may be helpful in identifying individuals with OI who have an increased risk of dental aberrations.

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