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Data from: Effects of assortative mate choice on the genomic and morphological structure of a hybrid zone between two bird subspecies

Citation

Semenov, Georgy A. et al. (2017), Data from: Effects of assortative mate choice on the genomic and morphological structure of a hybrid zone between two bird subspecies, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.fg49r

Abstract

Phenotypic differentiation plays an important role in the formation and maintenance of reproductive barriers. In some cases, variation in a few key aspects of phenotype can promote and maintain divergence; hence the identification of these traits and their associations with patterns of genomic divergence are crucial for understanding the patterns and processes of population differentiation. We studied hybridization between the alba and personata subspecies of the white wagtail (Motacilla alba), and quantified divergence and introgression of multiple morphological traits and 19,437 SNP loci on a 3000 km transect. Our goal was to identify traits that may contribute to reproductive barriers and to assess how variation in these traits corresponds to patterns of genome-wide divergence. Variation in only one trait – head plumage patterning – was consistent with reproductive isolation. Transitions in head plumage were steep and occurred over otherwise morphologically and genetically homogeneous populations, whereas cline centers for other traits and genomic ancestry were displaced over one hundred kilometers from the head cline. Field observational data show that social pairs mated assortatively by head plumage, suggesting that these phenotypes are maintained by divergent mating preferences. In contrast, variation in all other traits and genetic markers could be explained by neutral diffusion, although weak ecological selection cannot be ruled out. Our results emphasize that assortative mating may maintain phenotypic differences independent of other processes shaping genome-wide variation, consistent with other recent findings that raise questions about the relative importance of mate choice, ecological selection and selectively neutral processes for divergent evolution.

Usage Notes

Location

Uzbekistan
Kazakhstan
Russia