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Data from: Variability in commercial demand for tree saplings affects the probability of introducing exotic forest diseases

Citation

Alonso Chavez, Vasthi; Gilligan, Christopher A.; van den Bosch, Frank (2018), Data from: Variability in commercial demand for tree saplings affects the probability of introducing exotic forest diseases, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.g446vj1

Abstract

1. Several devastating forest pathogens are suspected or known to have entered the UK through imported planting material. The nursery industry is a key business of the tree trade network. Variability in demand for trees makes it difficult for nursery owners to predict how many trees to produce in their nursery. When in any given year, the demand for trees is larger than the production, nursery owners buy trees from foreign sources to match market demand. These imports may introduce exotic diseases. 2. We have developed a model of the dynamics of plant production linked to an economic model to quantify the effect of demand variability on the risk of introducing an exotic disease. 3. We find that - when the cost of producing a tree in a UK nursery is considerably smaller than the cost of importing a tree (in the example presented, less than half the importing cost), the risk of introducing an exotic disease is hardly affected by an increase in demand variability. - when the cost of producing a tree in the nursery is smaller than, but not very different from the cost of importing a tree, the risk of importing exotic diseases increases with increasing demand variability. 4. Synthesis and implications. Our results suggest that a balanced management of demand variability and costs can reduce the risk of importing an exotic forest disease according to the management strategy adopted.

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References

Location

United Kingdom