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Data from: Ultraviolet irradiation increases size of the first clutch but decreases longevity in a marine copepod

Citation

Heine, Kyle B. et al. (2019), Data from: Ultraviolet irradiation increases size of the first clutch but decreases longevity in a marine copepod, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.kg18b9c

Abstract

An important component of life history theory is understanding how natural variation arises in populations. Both endogenous and exogenous factors contribute to organism survival and reproduction, and therefore, it is important to understand how such factors are both beneficial and detrimental to population dynamics. One ecologically relevant factor that influences the life history of aquatic organisms is ultraviolet (UV) radiation. While the majority of research has focused on the potentially detrimental effects that UV radiation has on aquatic organisms, few studies have evaluated hormetic responses stimulated by radiation under select conditions. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of UV-A/B irradiation on life history characteristics in Tigriopus californicus copepods. After exposing copepods to UV-A/B irradiation (control, one, and three-hour UV treatments at 0.5 W/m2), we measured the impact of exposure on fecundity, reproductive effort, and longevity. We found that UV irradiation increased the size of the first clutch among all reproducing females in both the one and three-hour experimental groups and decreased longevity among all females that mated in the one-hour treatment. UV irradiation had no effect on the number of clutches females produced. These findings indicate a potential benefit of UV irradiation on reproductive performance early in life, although the same exposure came at a cost to longevity.

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